The periwinkle trailed its wreaths; If this belief from heaven be sent, restrain Those busy cares that would allay my pain; Oh! So didst thou travel on life’s common way, --Here are daisies, take your fill; Pansies, and the cuckoo-flower: Of the lofty daffodil Make your bed, or make your bower; Fill your lap, and fill your bosom; Only spare the strawberry-blossom!Primroses, the Spring may love them-- Summer knows but little of them: Violets, a barren kind, Withered on the ground must lie; Daisies leave no fruit behind When the pretty flowerets die; Pluck them, and another year As many will be blowing here.God has given a kindlier power To the favoured strawberry-flower. William Wordsworth . That there was pleasure there. If such be Nature’s holy plan, By the heart of Man, his tears, By his hopes and by his fears, Thou, too heedless, art the Warden Of a far superior garden. Most of his William Wordsworth has been considered as the pioneer of English Romanticism and he can be called as an interpreter of Nature. that walkest with me here,    If thou appear untouch'd by solemn thought,    Thy nature is not therefore less divine: Thou liest in Abraham's bosom all the year;    And worshipp'st at the Temple's inner shrine,    God being with thee when we know it not. restrainThose busy cares that would allay my pain;Oh! 6 Elizabeth Fay argues, in ways that again help place Wordsworth at the centre of contemporary debates on the role of ecology (and nature generally) in the politics of the person and the state, that Wordsworth's poems perform the act of making their performance appear natural or purely descriptive. as I cast my eyes, I see what was, and is, and will abide; Still glides the Stream, and shall for ever glide;    The Form remains, the Function never dies;    While we, the brave, the mighty, and the wise, We Men, who in our morn of youth defied The elements, must vanish;--be it so! EARTH has not anything to show more fair:    Dull would he be of soul who could pass by    A sight so touching in its majesty: This City now doth like a garment wear The beauty of the morning; silent, bare,    Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples lie    Open unto the fields, and to the sky; All bright and glittering in the smokeless air. The ship was nought to me, nor I to her, Yet I pursued her with a lover's look; This ship to all the rest did I prefer: When will she turn, and whither? Divine must be That triumph, when the very worst, the pain,And even the prospect of our brethren slain,Hath something in it which the heart enjoys:-In glory will they sleep and endless sanctity. The human soul that through me ran; The sun has long been set,The stars are out by twos and threes,The little birds are piping yetAmong the bushes and the trees;There's a cuckoo, and one or two thrushes,And a far-off wind that rushes,And a sound of water that gushes,And the cuckoo's sovereign cryFills all the hollow of the sky.Who would go `parading'In London, `and masquerading',On such a night of JuneWith that beautiful soft half-moon,And all these innocent blisses?On such a night as this is! William Wordsworth. Au gré de ses promenades le poète glane des beautés éphémères, s'émerveille devant le monde et la nature qui l'entoure. As a poet of Nature, Wordsworth stands supreme. the very houses seem asleep;And all that mighty heart is lying still! So be it when I shall grow old, 'For me, who under kindlier laws belongTo Nature's tuneful quire, this rustling dry Through leaves yet green, and yon crystalline sky,Announce a season potent to renew,'Mid frost and snow, the instinctive joys of song,And nobler cares than listless summer knew. William Wordsworth 7 April 1770 – 23 April 1850 7 avril 1770 – 22 avril 1850 * ***** TRADUCTION JACKY LAVAUZELLE French and English text texte bilingue français-anglais LES POÈMES DE WILLIAM WORDSWORTH ***** William Wordsworth’s poems POEMS POÈMES ***** * Scorn not the Sonnet Ne méprise pas le Sonnet. A Character by William Wordsworth. up with me into the clouds!For thy song, Lark, is strong;Up with me, up with me into the clouds!Singing, singing,With clouds and sky about thee ringing,Lift me, guide me till I findThat spot which seems so to thy mind!I have walked through wildernesses drearyAnd to-day my heart is weary;Had I now the wings of a Faery, Up to thee would I fly.There is madness about thee, and joy divineIn that song of thine;Lift me, guide me high and highTo thy banqueting-place in the sky.Joyous as morningThou art laughing and scorning;Thou hast a nest for thy love and thy rest,And, though little troubled with sloth,Drunken Lark! O'ER the wide earth, on mountain and on plain,Dwells in the affections and the soul of manA Godhead, like the universal PAN;But more exalted, with a brighter train:And shall his bounty be dispensed in vain,Showered equally on city and on field,And neither hope nor steadfast promise yieldIn these usurping times of fear and pain?Such doom awaits us. Lucy came from nature and to nature she shall return. All round this pool both flocks and herds might drink On its firm margin, even as from a well, Or some stone-basin which the herdsman's hand Had shaped for their refreshment; nor did sun, Or wind from any quarter, ever come, But as a blessing to this calm recess, This glade of water and this one green field. 4. Strawberry-blossoms, one and all, We must spare them--here are many: Look at it--the flower is small, Small and low, though fair as any: Do not touch it! His love of Nature was probably truer, and more tender, than that of any other English poet, before or since. BRIGHT Flower! “It Is a Beauteous Evening,” written by William Wordsworth, is a poem that captures the power of a tranquil moment in nature. The ship was nought to me, nor I to her, Yet I pursued her with a lover's look; This ship to all the rest did I prefer: When will she turn, and whither? In this poem, his continuity states that the site of Daffodils is the best, how the Daffodils are moving and moving from one place to another. for the might Of the whole world's good wishes with him goes; Blessings and prayers in nobler retinue Than sceptred king or laurelled conqueror knows, Follow this wondrous Potentate. Tree of holier powerThan that which in Dodona did enshrine(So faith too fondly deemed) a voice divineHeard from the depths of its aerial bower--How canst thou flourish at this blighting hour?What hope, what joy can sunshine bring to thee,Or the soft breezes from the Atlantic sea,The dews of morn, or April's tender shower?Stroke merciful and welcome would that beWhich should extend thy branches on the ground, If never more within their shady roundThose lofty-minded Lawgivers shall meet,Peasant and lord, in their appointed seat,Guardians of Biscay's ancient liberty. For oft, when on my couch I lie The basic things that Nature and its connection to humanity makes an appearance in the vast majority of Wordsworth's poetry, often holding a poem's focus, and has become the cornerstone of the Romantic Movement primarily because of him. Poèmes de William WORDSWORTH Publié le 11 juin 2018 ... Tel Chateaubriand aimant se réfugier au sein d'une nature consolante, Wordsworth a laissé sa marque dans la littérature romantique européenne. Pure as the naked heavens, majestic, free, one hope, one lot, One life, one glory!--I, with many a fearFor my dear Country, many heartfelt sighs,Among men who do not love her, linger here. His sorrows and awareness of humanity’s varied sufferings inevitably led to passages where the beauty of nature contrasted with the fate of man. Heavy in the importance of elements of nature, the poem captures Wordsworth’s Romantic focus that pervades his poetry. And, should I live through sun and rain Seven widowed years without my Jane, O Sexton, do not then remove her, Let one grave hold the Loved and Lover! A Night-Piece by William Wordsworth. Written By. The world is too much with us; late and soon, Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers: Little we see in Nature that is ours; We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon! Hither soon as spring is fled You and Charles and I will walk; Lurking berries, ripe and red, Then will hang on every stalk, Each within its leafy bower; And for that promise spare the flower! When all at once I saw a crowd, And give us manners, virtue, freedom, power. Wordsworth sought to bring a more individualistic approach, his poetry avoided high flown language however the poetry of Wordsworth is best characterised by its strong affinity with nature and in particular the Lake District where he lived. How does the Meadow-flower its bloom unfold? Tis a note of enchantment; what ails her? Wordsworth offered not just a beautiful picture of nature but also illustrated the healing power of natureon the spirit of man. William Wordsworth’s interpretation of nature is evident throughout his poetry, as is his interpretation of poetry itself. In 1798, at the age of 28, Wordsworth claimed that he had long been a 'worshipper of Nature'. In his poems “The World is Too Much with Us” and “Nutting”, William Wordsworth makes use of the portrayal of the beauties of nature to deplore the greed of man who is mindlessly exploiting nature. dear Girl! the mighty Being is awake,    And doth with his eternal motion make A sound like thunder--everlastingly. Mark the spot to which I point! William Wordsworth wrote the poem “Resolution and Independence” around 1802, modifying it several times months later, publishing it only in 1807 in the poem volume “Poems in Two Volumes”.. Summary analysis of the poem. A Night Thought by William Wordsworth. that walkest with me here, If thou appear untouched by solemn thought, Thy nature is not therefore less divine: Thou liest in Abraham's bosom all the year, And worship'st at the Temple's inner shrine, God being with thee when we know it not. 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